News and events by date of posting

Press Release: NACM and NYSHN launch Toolkit

Native Youth Sexual Health Network and

The National Aboriginal Council of Midwives Launch

Aboriginal Midwifery Toolkit

Resource aims to increase midwifery care for First Nations, Inuit and Métis

Toronto, May 28, 2014 – The National Aboriginal Council of Midwives (NACM) and the Native Youth Sexual Health Network (NYSHN) are excited to announce the launch of the Aboriginal Midwifery Toolkit. Developed to provide concrete knowledge and tools for First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities looking to bring birth and midwifery care closer to home, the Toolkit is an interactive online resource with a print version designed for communities with limited internet access. It can be found at http://www.nacmtoolkit.ca/

“We are launching this innovative toolkit at an exciting time, when the number of Aboriginal midwives working in practices providing care to Aboriginal communities across Canada is growing. However, many Aboriginal families are still not able to access midwifery care in their communities. As a result, maternal mortality remains high and infant mortality rates are 1.7- 4 times higher than in non-Aboriginal communities. ” Ellen Blais, Co-chair of the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives  

"Young people and communities tell us all the time about the need for on the ground supports and resources for birth and reproductive justice. We are honored to continue to partner with the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives in supporting the releases of the toolkit across Turtle Island. The importance of the resurgence of Indigenous midwifery and doula knowledge - and access to it - cannot be overstated." Jessica Danforth, Executive Director, Native Youth Sexual Health Network

 

The launch is taking place concurrently with the Global Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Summit: Saving Every Woman, Every Child conference, hosted by Canada from May 28 – 30, 2014, in order to underline the crucial role Aboriginal midwives play in diminishing health disparities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal mothers. “NACM and NYSHN support the fact the Government of Canada is taking a leadership role in advocating for improved maternal health outcomes globally, and want to sustain the focus of governments and communities across Canada with respect to the health care provided to Aboriginal women and children in Canada”, affirmed Ms. Blais.

NYSHN and NACM will be hosting a special reception for the launch of the Toolkit on May 28th at 6pm, at the new Toronto Birth Centre, that just celebrated its 50th birth!

NACM and NYSHN work together at the intersections of sexual and reproductive health, rights, and justice. These intersections include bridging the gap between culturally safe sex education and midwifery care through a mutually supportive partnership that will increase education, share skills, as well the opportunity for NACM members and NYSHN staff to work collaboratively to deliver workshops and information in our communities. We will also be working to improve access to midwifery care amongst younger parents and other members in our networks - including people who are incarcerated, within the criminal justice or child welfare system, HIV positive, Two-Spirit, Trans, and Gender non-conforming families.

About NACM

The National Aboriginal Council of Midwives is a diverse group of midwives from all regions of Canada, representing First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities.  We advocate for the restoration of midwifery education, the provision of midwifery services, and choice of birthplace for all Aboriginal communities. www.aboriginalmidwives.ca

About NYSHN

The Native Youth Sexual Health Network is an organization by and for Indigenous youth that works across issues of sexual and reproductive health, rights, and justice throughout the United States and Canada. NYSHN works with Indigenous peoples to advocate for and build strong, comprehensive, and culturally safe sexual and reproductive health initiatives in their own communities. www.nativeyouthsexualhealth.com

 

Immediate inquiries:

Valérie Perrault, NACM coordinator

(514) 216-2213 [email protected]

 

 

Krysta Williams, Advocacy and Outreach Coordinator-Native Youth Sexual Health

Network - 416 602 1343

 

Press Release: International Day of the Midwife

THE NATIONAL ABORIGINAL COUNCIL OF MIDWIVES AND THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF MIDWIVES: ALL CANADIAN WOMEN DESERVE EQUAL ACCESS TO MIDWIFERY SERVICES

Montréal, May 3rd, 2013 - On May 5th 2013, International Day of the Midwife, the Canadian Association of Midwives (CAM) and the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives (NACM), are calling on Canadians to voice their concern about the health disparities and inequalities faced by many women living in rural, remote and Aboriginal communities across the country.

 

On this important day for midwives across the world, CAM and NACM are voicing concerns about a recent UNICEF report (April 2013) that found that Canada ranked 22nd out of 29 developed countries for infant mortality rates, with higher rates among Aboriginal communities.

 

“In 2013, it is unacceptable that infant mortality is 2 to 4 times greater in Aboriginal communities than non-Aboriginal communities”, says Ms Nathalie Pambrun, co-Chair of the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives (NACM). “Aboriginal midwives play an important role in returning birth back to rural and remote communities and improving maternal and newborn health outcomes” concluded Ms. Pambrun.

 

“What we need is to work with the federal government to provide support for direct midwifery services on federal jurisdictions such as on reserves”, says Mrs. Joanna Nemrava, President of the Canadian Association of Midwives (CAM). “Midwives provide a safe, effective and low-cost solution to all Canadian women and are well positioned to address the specific challenges still faced by women in rural, remote and particularly Aboriginal communities across Canada.”

 

The Canadian Association of Midwives (CAM) represents midwives and the profession of midwifery across the country. Its mission is to provide leadership and advocacy for midwifery as a regulated, publicly funded and vital part of the primary maternity care system in all provinces and territories. Additionally, Aboriginal midwives are represented by the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives (NACM), an organization that promotes excellence in reproductive care for Aboriginal women. Both organizations are hoping to work with the federal government to address these important health issues and ensure that all Canadian women, including those living on reserves and other federal jurisdictions get equal access to midwifery services.

 

Important Facts

  • Midwives are primary health care providers who work as part of the health care system in most provinces and territories. They provide care to women during pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period.  Evidence from around the world demonstrates that midwives are essential to improving the lives of mothers and babies. However, only 2% to 5% of women in Canada receive midwifery care services.
  • Women in remote areas often must leave their community for weeks before birth. The disruption of social networks at this important time is detrimental to the health of women, their families and their communities. Midwifery care is a safe and cost effective solution that can be applied in rural and remote regions to bring birth as close to home as possible

About Midwifery in Canada

 

There are just over 1100 registered midwives in Canada. The Canadian Association of Midwives (CAM) is the national organization representing midwives and the profession of midwifery in Canada. The mission of CAM is to provide leadership and advocacy for midwifery as a regulated, publicly funded and vital part of the primary maternity care system in all provinces and territories.

 

The National Aboriginal Council of Midwives (NACM) exists to promote excellence in reproductive health care for Inuit, First Nations, and Métis women. NACM advocates for the restoration of midwifery education, the provision of midwifery services, and choice of birthplace for all Aboriginal communities consistent with the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

 

 

Information:

Tonia Occhionero

Executive Director/Directrice générale

Canadian Association of Midwives/

Association canadienne des sages-femmes

 

514-807-3668

 

NACM Co-chair, Kerry Bebee, accepts AOM award on behalf of elder Cree Midwife, Mrs. Wabano

Kerry Bebee, Co-chair of the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives, accepted an award on behalf of Mrs Wabano during the Association of Ontario Midwives May 2013 Conference. 

Kerry Bebee, Co-chair of the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives, accepted an award on behalf of Mrs. Marguerite Wabano, an elder Cree Midwife who turned 109 years of age last January. This award was given by the AOM’s Executive Director, Kelly Stadelbauer, during the Association of Ontario Midwives Annual Conference which took place from May 6th-8th 2013. During this event, Kerry acknowledged Mrs. Wabano’s contribution to midwifery.  For many years, Mrs. Wabano served the Mushkego women and families, by attending births all along the Coast. Her work as a midwife was sharing ceremony of women's teachings, giving them strength to bring life into the world. NACM wishes to thank and honour Mrs. Wabano for her years of service and dedication to the Mushkego women and families.

 

Press Release: International Day of the Midwife 2014

Midwives: Changing the world, one family at a time

May 5th - International Day of the Midwife

Midwives: Changing the world, one family at a time

Montréal, May 5th, 2014 - Today on International Day of the Midwife, the Canadian Association of Midwives (CAM) and the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives (NACM) would like to join the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) in calling attention to maternal and infant health around the world. Approximately 290,000 women and over 3 million infants die each year as a result of pregnancy and childbirth complications. If every childbearing woman received care with a well-educated, adequately resourced midwife, most of these maternal and newborn deaths could be prevented.

From May 28 - 30, 2014, Canada will be hosting the Global Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Summit: Saving Every Woman, Every Child. CAM has been invited to participate in this summit, helping to ensure that the life-saving care that midwives provide around the world will be on the agenda. It is key that this summit result not only in words of support; it must translate into direct action and funding for increased access to appropriate care for mothers and newborns around the world. Midwifery care is safe and cost-effective, and can save millions of lives every year. Investing in midwifery care can help achieve the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 of reducing child and maternal mortality by more than two thirds.

"We welcome the opportunity to participate in the upcoming MNCH Summit in Toronto," said Joanna Nemrava, CAM President and midwife in British Columbia. "To ensure that every woman has access to skilled maternity care for herself and her newborn, the 2011 UNFPA report State of the World's Midwifery estimates the need for 350,000 more midwives; direct funding for increased maternity care, including midwifery care, must be a priority at this summit."

This year, in honour of International Day of the Midwife, Members of Parliament Lois Brown and Peggy Nash have offered statements of support for midwifery care. This multi-party support speaks to the fact that midwives, as primary care providers, are part of the solution to the health care crisis here in Canada, as well as around the world. Currently, women and families in many parts of Canada, including Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador and the Yukon have zero access to midwifery care. CAM and NACM are also working with Members of Parliament to have May 5th recognized as National Day of the Midwife in Canada, a symbolic gesture that would help to increase accessibility to midwifery care for all women and families.  

"Here in Canada, women living in rural and remote areas, especially Aboriginal women have limited or no access to maternity care in their own community, and we know that midwives can help to bring birth closer to home" said Kerry Bebee, NACM Co-chair and midwife in Ontario. "Maternal and infant health outcomes in Aboriginal communities are significantly worse than in the rest of Canada, and midwifery care, with its focus on continuity of care and community-based care, is key to improving these outcomes and saving the lives of moms and babies. Aboriginal midwives, working in Aboriginal communities, effectively diminish the health disparity that exists between Aboriginal mothers and non-Aboriginal mothers."

Important Facts

  • Midwives are primary health care providers who work as part of the health care system in most provinces and territories. They provide care to women during pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period. Evidence from around the world demonstrates that midwives are essential to improving the lives of mothers and babies. However, only 2% to 5% of women in Canada receive midwifery care services.
  • Women in remote areas often must leave their community for weeks before birth. The disruption of social networks at this important time is detrimental to the health of women, their families and their communities. Midwifery care is a safe and cost effective solution that can be applied in rural and remote regions to bring birth as close to home as possible.

About Midwifery in Canada

There are 1300 registered midwives in Canada. The Canadian Association of Midwives (CAM) is the national organization representing midwives and the profession of midwifery in Canada. The mission of CAM is to provide leadership and advocacy for midwifery as a regulated, publicly funded and vital part of the primary maternity care system in all provinces and territories.

The National Aboriginal Council of Midwives (NACM) exists to promote excellence in reproductive health care for Inuit, First Nations, and Métis women. NACM advocate's for the restoration of midwifery education, the provision of midwifery services, and choice of birthplace for all Aboriginal communities consistent with the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

For more information about NACM, visit our website at www.aboriginalmidwives.ca

For more information about CAM, visit our website at www.canadianmidwives.org

Information:

Tonia Occhionero

Executive Director

Canadian Association of Midwives

[email protected]

514-807-3668

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5 mai - Journée internationale de la sage-femme

Être sage-femme : changer le monde, une famille à la fois

Montréal, le 5 mai 2014 - En cette Journée internationale de la sage-femme, l'Association canadienne des sages-femmes (ACSF) et la National Aboriginal Council of Midwives (NACM) aimeraient joindre leurs voix à celle de la Confédération internationale des sages-femmes (ICM) pour mettre en lumière la question de la santé maternelle et infantile dans le monde. Environ 290 000 femmes et plus de 3 millions de nourrissons meurent chaque année par suite de complications liées à la grossesse et à la naissance. Si chaque femme enceinte obtenait les soins d'une sage-femme bien formée et bénéficiant de ressources adéquates, la plupart de ces décès maternels et néonataux pourraient être évités.

Du 28 au 30 mai 2014, le Canada accueillera le Sommet mondial sur la santé des mères, des nouveau-nés et des enfants (SMNE), qui a pour thème « Sauvons chaque femme, chaque enfant ». Invitée à prendre part à ce sommet, l'ACSF entend s'assurer que les soins vitaux apportés par les sages-femmes partout dans le monde apparaissent à l'ordre du jour de l'événement. Il est crucial que ce sommet se traduise non seulement par un soutien verbal, mais aussi par des actions directes et du financement concret afin d'accroître l'accès aux soins de santé appropriés pour les mères et leurs nouveau-nés, aux quatre coins de la planète. Sécuritaire et rentable, la pratique sage-femme peut sauver des millions de vies annuellement. Investir dans la pratique sage-femme peut contribuer à l'atteinte des 4e et 5e objectifs du Millénaire pour le développement, soit réduire de plus de deux tiers la mortalité infantile et maternelle.

« Nous sommes heureuses d'avoir la possibilité de participer au prochain Sommet SMNE à Toronto, » affirme Joanna Nemrava, présidente de l'ACSF et sage-femme pratiquant en Colombie-Britannique. « Pour que chaque femme ait accès à la prestation de soins de santé professionnels pour elle et son nouveau-né, le rapport La pratique sage-femme dans le monde 2011 de l'UNFPA estime qu'il faudrait un afflux supplémentaire de 350 000 sages-femmes. Le financement direct afin d'accroître les soins de santé maternels, y compris les soins procurés par les sages-femmes, doit être une priorité de ce sommet. »

Par ailleurs, à l'occasion de la Journée internationale de la sage-femme, les députées Lois Brown et Peggy Nash ont offert cette année des déclarations de soutien à la pratique sage-femme. Ce soutien multipartite attire l'attention sur le fait que, à titre de prestataires de soins de santé primaires, les sages-femmes font partie intégrante de la solution à la crise des soins de santé, au Canada comme ailleurs dans le monde. Actuellement, plusieurs régions du Canada, y compris l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, le Nouveau-Brunswick, Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador et le Yukon, n'offrent aucun accès à la pratique sage-femme pour les femmes et leurs familles. De concert avec plusieurs députés, l'ACSF et NACM œuvrent également à faire désigner le 5 mai « Journée nationale de la sage-femme au Canada », une reconnaissance symbolique qui contribuerait à faire accroître l'accès à la pratique sage-femme pour toutes les femmes et leurs familles.

« Au Canada, les femmes vivant en milieu rural ou en régions éloignées, et tout particulièrement les femmes autochtones, ne bénéficient que d'un accès limité aux soins maternels au sein de leurs propres communautés, lorsqu'ils ne sont pas carrément inexistants. Nous savons que les sages-femmes peuvent aider à ramener les naissances à proximité des collectivités, » explique Kerry Bebee, coprésidente de la NACM et sage-femme pratiquant en Ontario. « Les répercussions des problèmes de santé maternelle et infantile au sein des communautés autochtones sont nettement pires que dans le reste du Canada. En mettant l'accent sur des soins continus et communautaires, la pratique sage-femme est l'élément crucial qui contribue à améliorer ces répercussions et à sauver la vie des mères et des nouveau-nés. Les sages-femmes autochtones travaillant au sein des communautés autochtones permettent de diminuer efficacement l'écart existant entre mères autochtones et mères non-autochtones en matière de santé. »

Quelques faits importants :

  • Les sages-femmes offrent des soins de première ligne et font partie intégrante du système de santé de la plupart des provinces et territoires. Elles font des suivis complets de maternité, ce qui inclut le suivi prénatal, l'accouchement, et le suivi postnatal de la mère et du nouveau-né. Les données probantes démontrent que les sages-femmes contribuent à la réduction de la mortalité maternelle et infantile. Cependant, seules 2 % à 5 % des femmes canadiennes ont accès aux services de sage-femme.
  • Les femmes enceintes issues de zones éloignées doivent quitter leur communauté plusieurs semaines avant l'accouchement. Cette séparation crée une brisure dans leur réseau social à un moment important de leur vie, au détriment de leur santé, de celle de leurs enfants, de leurs familles et de leurs communautés. Les services de sage-femme sont une solution à faible coût et peuvent être instaurés aisément dans les régions rurales et éloignées, permettant ainsi au processus de la naissance d'avoir lieu près des communautés.

À propos de la pratique sage-femme au Canada

Il y a1300 sages-femmes qui pratiquent au Canada. L'Association canadienne des sages-femmes (ACSF) est l'organisation nationale qui représente les sages-femmes et la profession sage-femme au Canada. La mission de l'ACSF consiste à ouvrir la voie et à assurer un soutien à la profession sage-femme en tant que profession réglementée, financée par l'État, qui joue un rôle vital au sein du système de soins de maternité primaires dans l'ensemble des provinces et des territoires.

The National Aboriginal Council of Midwives (NACM) exists to promote excellence in reproductive health care for Inuit, First Nations, and Métis women. NACM advocates for the restoration of midwifery education, the provision of midwifery services, and choice of birthplace for all Aboriginal communities consistent with the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. (disponible en anglais seulement)

Pour plus d'informations sur NACM, visitez notre site Web : www.aboriginalmidwives.ca

Pour plus d'informations sur l'ACSF, visitez notre site Web : www.canadianmidwives.org.

Information :

Tonia Occhionero

Directrice générale

Association canadienne des sages-femmes

[email protected]

514-807-3668